Solid Concepts_DMLS va_opt

Rapid shift – 3D printing poised to turn prototyping on its head.

Engineers and product designers have more rapid prototyping choices than an aficionado at an art fair. Stereolithography (SLA), selective laser sintering (SLS), fused deposition modeling (FDM) and direct metal laser sintering (DMLS) are but some of the available additive manufacturing (AM) technologies, which cover a range of materials from nylon, polycarbonate, PEEK (polyether ether ketone)[…]

OPM_Figure6_0

First 510(k) Clearance for Customized 3D-Printed Polymeric Cranial Implants

Oxford Performance Materials (OPM), South Windsor, Conn., made medical history in February when they received the first Food and Drug Administration (FDA) 510(k) clearance for their polymer laser-sintered OsteoFab Patient-Specific Cranial Device (OPSCD). The customizable implant is designed to restore voids in the skull caused by trauma or disease. Manufactured in a matter of hours[…]

micro-scopes

Micro Scopes: Making Endoscopes Smaller

Once-revolutionary microdevices that allow doctors to examine internal parts of the human body are now commonplace. One of the most commonly used of these devices is the endoscope, and its use is growing. The U.S. endoscopy market was valued at more than $9.87 billion in 2011, according to Sara Whitmore, analyst manager at iData Research[…]

thread whirling

Thread Whirling Boosts Productivity

Ever since British machine inventor Henry Maudslay introduced the first modern screw-cutting lathe towards the end of the 18th century, machinists have been cussing him. True, the world as we know it couldn’t exist without screw threads, but that doesn’t make cutting them any easier. Compared to other turning operations, single-point threading is slow, requiring[…]

down-to-the-wire

Down to the Wire – ‘Spiderman’ microwire used in medical devices

Spiders have been doing it for millions of years: Spinning out material that’s stronger than steel, and—metaphorically at least—lighter than air. Luckily for the spider, she doesn’t have to cut tight-tolerance features on her delicate tapestry, or twist it up into precision coils and helix shapes to catch her meals. The microwire industry is spinning[…]